Care for a Warm-Up?

No? Hmm…

I’m consistently surprised at the number of singers I encounter that don’t
have a warm up routine to use before performance. At best, they “sing the
easy songs” to warm up. I’ve been intrigued as to why this is so, I’ve
started asking people. I mostly hear this response…


“Warming up makes my voice tired.”



Y’all. I’m gonna be real for a second. If your warm up make you tired, then
that warm up stinks. Get yourself a new one. Holy moly! A good warm up
should simply live up to its namesake and, WARM YOU UP. Not wear you out! That’s a BAD
warm up. Run away from it. Quit it like it’s a drug habit. Make like a tree,
and leave. (haha)



Your warm up should make you feel ready and confident vocally to perform at
your absolute best. It needs to encompass all parts of your voice but it
needs to be gentle and easy.



Here’s an example of a good warm up:
1) Start with lip rolls or tongue trills to connect easily between bridges.
2) Do a simple speech-level chest voice exercise, followed by one in head voice.
3) Start activating your edges with some vocal fry or staccato squeaky sounds.
4) Then open up your pharyngeal resonator with a good ole “nay” or “meow.”


5) Finally, put it all together: stretch your range through your bridges and into your mix while keeping normalization and balancing in mind. Think, “One Voice” all the way up and down, as you go through exercises that utilize the whole range. (e.g. using the syllable “mum” on a long scale.)



If you still experience fatigue, give me a ring and let me help you tweak
some tension out. I will bet you $1,000,000,000 that you will feel more
ready than ever for your performance if you do these simple warm-ups
beforehand… I’m no millionaire, and I hate debt, so you can bet I think these exercises are a safe bet!



See for yourself! And if you need more specific direction to tailor your
warm up to your unique voice, let’s Skype in for a lesson and make that happen. No two
voices are the same, so let’s custom fit this for you!



Happy singing!



To book a lesson with Shelby Rollins, contact [email protected] or call Daniel at (615) 866-1099.