Sharpen Senses As You Learn To Sing




One of the biggest challenges a lot of singers say they face has to do with developing muscle memory and getting the coordinations to become second nature as they work through programs like Singing Success and Mastering Mix.



Granted there is no substitute for making a strong commitment to daily practice that includes a proper warm up. But what can happen is that overall perceptions may be fuzzy because you’re in a hurry or feel stressed. You may be easily distracted or may have never given yourself the proper time and full attention required to relax and simply focus.

Skimming The Surface

A lack of focus creates a kind of surface impression or tenuous reception in your understanding of what you’re taking in. Frankly, we all have a tendency to grab little bits of information because we’re used to surfing the Web, Googling for the facts or quick fixes, grabbing bits and pieces of information we need, and not always filing it away. Many times not much is done to process or take the information to heart.

This is the same sort of thing that happens when you read the Cliff Notes or a skim a condensed version of a novel. You skip all of the details, get the key points that give you the gist of the story and characters; but the deeper meaning of the full experience is missed, along with important themes or theories, and what resonates remains on the surface.

Quick + Lasting Results With Practice

The techniques and exercises that are presented in Brett Manning’s teaching will quickly generate powerful positive results because of his committed in depth of study of all of the physical mechanics and creative dynamics that factor into singing. When performed and practiced properly and consistently, you will continue to build on a solid foundation for exploring the full potential of your voice.

Don’t Rush or Brush Off

But this requires a full commitment and a sharpened focus. If you rush through the program, let your attention wander, or you don’t fully commit, coordinations will not come as quickly and muscle memory will be compromised, slow, and possibly even strained. So, never just brush off or dismiss a warm up. And never rush your practice. Always do a quick review later in the day of any sessions you’ve had with coaches and any lessons practiced from programs like a href=”http://singingsuccess.com/products/full-singing-success-program”>Singing Success, Mastering Mix, or others.

See – Hear – Touch

To sharpen your senses and enhance perceptions you want to regularly exercise your sense of hearing, sense of sight, and sense of muscle motion or touch. The reason for this is that people tend to be either visual learners, auditory learners, or kinesthetic learners. In other words so that something sticks, some people learn by seeing, some by hearing, and others need a hands-on feel before really taking something to heart so that it becomes second nature.

Brett’s Teaching Engages All Three

The process of engaging all three learning approaches serves to fully reinforce what is being learned. And, Brett’s methods naturally incorporate all three. You’ll likely notice that even though you’re singing and working with your voice that it helps to get a mental picture of what is happening when you work through an exercise. You’ll also notice that by feeling the tension or position of the tongue, throat, or lips during an exercise, it reinforces what you’re trying to achieve.

Shake Up For A Change

To help enhance your perceptions and sharpen your senses, shake up the environment where you warm up and practice and change up your routine from time to time. Warm up in a different room or environment. Perform your exercise or practice routine in a totally different setting.

Adaptation Awareness

What the change will do is force you to listen for, look for, and feel for proper coordinations and techniques engaged in your routine. It also trains your ability to adapt to different environments, something that is part of the nature of the business of singing. The art of singing is an ongoing process of adaptation – song by song, audience by audience, band by band, gig by gig.

You’ll perform in a variety of venues under varying degrees of circumstances and situations that will try your patience, challenge your ability to focus, as well as provide visual and aural distractions. But these are also opportunities to sharpen your senses and further enhance your perceptions.

Use Clips To Sharpen Perceptions

You can also use the clips here at SingingSuccess.tv as opportunities to sharpen your senses and to enhance your perceptive potential. There is a simple, fun exercise or practice to enhance that you can share with others via a forum thread. It gives you the chance to exercise your visual, aural, and tactile learning processes. Here’s how it goes.

Take a video clip and watch it through once. Afterward, write down what you remember visually. Ask yourself: what did I see that sticks with me about what Brett or Shelby or Jesse, Jason, or Leigh presented? If it’s a performance clip, ask yourself what stands out visually? Then, ask yourself: what sounds resonate? What do I remember hearing that touched me or made a connection somehow? And then ask: what moved me? In other words, what prompted a physical reaction? It might have triggered head-bobbing or nodding or even toe-tapping. It may have triggered you to check for positioning of the tongue or a feeling in the throat.

Compare + Share Experiences

Compare your perceptions and sensory responses to those experience by others here at SingingSuccess.tv and share the challenges you have with muscle memory, commitment to practice, focus, distraction, and perception. Brainstorm on ways to make your practice sessions more adventurous while reinforcing the powerful techniques and methods that Brett Manning provides that has been designed to enhance your singing success.